Measuring the Human Landscape

Drawings (pen and crayon on Japanese paper, folded)

50x71cm each

2015-2016

 

Exhibition views:

NON-LIEUX

Pavillon 31, Vienna

June 2016

 

Blütengasse, Vienna

December 2015

Drawing (200x100cm), site-specific intervention (reconstruction of the wall), stone

 

 

All records and descriptions are people's attempts to depict reality. Constructivism questions this process of the realization of knowledge: knowledge and reality do not necessarily coincide, and only by the attempt to describe the world is reality constructed. Paper has been used for a long time and still as a carrier material for ideas and illustrations and generates meanings. In sum, these become a world view.

 

A sheet of paper is relatively easy to describe. Folded paper is more difficult to grasp, because many possible perspectives arise. Folding creates incisions and locations in the paper, which escape from the location. In attempting to record these, one reaches the limits of the physically perceptible. If folded, crumpled papers are recorded, decisions are made for possible viewing angles and other readabilities are blanked. Even with a variety of records from different perspectives, the folded object might never be fully captured.

 

In the drawing process, such incomplete images of a crumpled and folded object are translated into a cartography. By arranging and overlaying individual drawings of manipulated papers, map-like drawings are created. However the map is not the area. And the decision which element is placed where is a subjective one. Even if she gets an apparent objectivity by using elements from the cartography and by text.

 

 

 

Measuring the Human Landscape, Michaela Putz 2016; drawing
Measuring the Human Landscape #2, Michaela Putz 2016, drawing
Measuring the Human Landscape #3, Michaela Putz 2016, drawing
Measuring the Human Landscape, installation view, Michaela Putz 2016, drawings
Measuring the Human Landscape, installation view, Michaela Putz 2015; drawing, sgraffito, stone
Measuring the Human Landscape, installation view, Michaela Putz 2015; drawing, sgraffito, stone